7 Jewish Bloggers Who Deserve More Attention

There are a lot of great Jewish bloggers out there, and they deserve all the attention of the world showered on them. So now, while my blog has gotten just a bit of attention showered upon it, I’d like to take the opportunity to share with you a few that I think are doing amazing, amazing work and who I wish all the success in the world.

DISCLAIMER: I purposefully did not call this the “7 Best Jewish Bloggers On The Web” or some other such thing, because this post is shamelessly subjective. I love these people, and I don’t have any idea if they’re actually the best bloggers on the web. I also have a personal relationship, on some level, with most of them, but that’s mostly because I think they’re so awesome and reached out to them after reading their stuff. So, yeah, no complaints about that, okay?

1. Ruchi Koval – Out Of The Ortho Box

4484_1145663089337_2079836_n

I think Ruchi’s blog might be one of the best kept secrets in the Jewish webosphere. She’s a rebbitzen residing in Cleveland, who runs the Jewish Family Experience, a “family-based learning center”.

Her blog is so powerful because while it aims so high in terms of ideals and being true to its orthodox stance, it is powerfully honest. She doesn’t try to put on the fake “holy” airs you see on so many dry-as-crust rabbi blogs on the web. This is the real deal. And in my opinion, it’s the best blog by an orthodox Jew on the web right now.

It’s getting out there, thank G-d, and I’ve noticed her shares increasing over time. But she’s told me herself that she does very little to market it. So, if you haven’t checked it out, I highly recommend that you do.

Click here to visit Ruchi’s blog.

2. Rivki Silver – Life In The Married Lane

582503_10200646987834811_431181354_n

Rivki and I connected because we almost simultaneously became huge fans of each other’s blogs. I love her work for much of the same reasons I love Ruchi’s blog. It is beautiful, high-minded, and gentle, but still honest and real. She has an amazing skill to write about things like teshuva, diaper changes, and more in creative and thoughtful ways.

While many bloggers seem to be stuck in the idea that a blog needs to just be one form of media (writing), she’s started to mix her media, incorporating images and more in her posts.

She’s also not afraid to take a stance on controversial issues when it matters, but doesn’t go out of her way to throw her hat into the ring just for some hits. I love her blog, and I think you will too.

Click here to visit Rivki’s blog.

3. Matthue Roth

316326_10150370883641667_1941896196_n

Matthue is mostly known for his great memoir, Yom Kippur a Go-Go, novels, and, most recently, his acclaimed children’s book “My Little Kafka”. But did you know he also blogs? I mean, he only does it only once or twice a month, but I always love his posts. They can be funny, sensitive, or just interesting. But they’re always written from a genuine voice and with the quiet confidence of a seasoned writer.

On a personal level, I also just love Matthue. He is one of the biggest encouragers of creativity within the New York City Hasidic community, and is always available for some great feedback if you need it. He was a great help for me when I was just starting to really take writing seriously, and I know he’s helped other writers quite a bit as well.

Check out Matthue’s blog here.

4. Levi Margolin

68752_10152134825845068_1645628798_n

Levi recently made a name for himself with his blog post on the Times of Israel called “Don’t Call Me Hareidi.” It got some great discussion going, but more importantly, it was one of the few blog posts out there of a Hassidic Jew making a clear delineation between his own way of looking at the world and the ones who have taken things too far. I was proud to see someone speaking so powerfully about the topic, not holding back punches, but also making a positive end-point.

Levi’s continued to blog since then, and his most recent post about 9/11 is particularly powerful. Levi is a rising star in the Jewish blogging circuit, and he deserves it.

Check out Levi’s blog here.

5. Yitzchok Moully – Art for the Soul

I’ve written about Moully before (oh and one other time) but I think he deserves another mention for this fantastic blog.

Art for the Soul is a Chabad.org blog that showcases Jewish art of everyone from famous artists to amateurs. But no matter what, he seems to have a great eye for picking wonderful pieces. Pieces that aren’t just nice ones you stick on your wall that no one notices, but pieces with a message. Pieces that inspire. Pieces that make you think. And the best part is that he posts a piece (alm0st) daily.

Art for the Soul is an extension of Moully’s larger initiative, The Creative Soul, an organization devoted to increasing support for creativity in the religious Jewish community. Also, every year, after Sukkot, he arranges a great gallery with events in the heart of Crown Heights. Keep your eyes peeled if you’re in the area.

Check out Yitzchok’s blog here.

6. Alisheva Givre – My Shtub

536371_10150764033457277_1309503233_n

In my opinion, Alisheva’s blog is a work of art. The moment you get there, the clean look of the site hits you. And as you scroll down and see the beautiful, original images she’s captured and shared, the beauty is almost overwhelming.

My Shtub is a mish-mash of her wonderful photography, her daily thoughts, and an effort to bring awareness about Down Syndrome. Her daughter is diagnosed with it, and she’s done an amazing job of sharing the beauty of raising these children, in a way that’s neither preachy nor overwrought. It’s just real and open, like the design of her site.

Check out Alisheva’s blog here.

7. Sarah Tuttle-Singer

photo 3

Okay, Sarah really doesn’t need any help getting the word out about her writing, which is why I stuck her way down here at number seven. Her writing is almost inherently shareable, and her incredible post that started the #nomorefakebook revolution not only went epically viral but also won a People’s Choice Award from BlogHer.

But awards and popularity are not what make Sarah’s writing great. It’s the combination of her ability to be both incredibly real, raw, and true, while still always entertaining that, in my opinion, makes her not just one of the best Jewish bloggers but one of the best writers online. Sarah is one of those people that inspires me as a writer, and makes me realize the power we have to change the world if only we tap into the honest parts of ourselves.

For all those reasons and more, Sarah may have a lot of attention, but she’ll always deserve more, which is why she’s on this list.

Check out Sarah’s blogs here and here.

Discuss This Post On Facebook: